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Celebrate National Blood Donor Day with a lifesaving donation

Blood donations typically decline in late spring and early summer, especially during holiday weeks. Unfortunately, this proved true last month, when the Red Cross collected 20,000 fewer blood donations than needed to protect its national blood supply. With potential severe weather and record-breaking travel ahead this summer, the supply may be affected even further. Right now, blood and platelet donors are critically needed to help patients in need of lifesaving transfusions.
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The Dandridge family is affected by sickle cell disease and relies on the blood donations of others | American Red Cross

The American Red Cross is celebrating World Blood Donor Day by saying thank you to all past and future blood and platelet donors. World Blood Donor Day is recognized each year on June 14. This day is meant to raise awareness of the need for a safe and stable blood supply and to recognize volunteer blood donors for their lifesaving role in patient care.

Blood donations typically decline in late spring and early summer – especially during holiday weeks, like Memorial Day and Independence Day. Unfortunately, this proved true last month, when the Red Cross collected 20,000 fewer blood donations than needed to protect the Red Cross-national blood supply. The Red Cross expects that severe weather and record-breaking travel will continue throughout the summer, potentially further impacting the ability of donors to give blood. Blood and platelet donors are critically needed to help patients in need of lifesaving blood and platelet transfusions.

Only three out of 100 people in the U.S. give blood, making blood donors a pretty special and generous crowd of people.

The Red Cross encourages those who may be eligible to join this lifesaving group by rolling up a sleeve and donating blood or platelets now and in the weeks ahead this summer.

You don’t need to know your blood type to make a lifesaving blood donation. Schedule your blood donation by using the Blood Donor App, by visiting RedCrossBlood.org or calling 1-800-RED CROSS (1-800-733-2767).

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Blood donations are essential for patients who need many different kinds of medical treatments, including the Dandridge family. David Dandridge, Jr. and his three children were born with sickle cell disease, a genetic blood disorder that can cause severe pain, tissue and organ damage, and even strokes.

Both David and his daughter, Skylar, have endured pain crises and relied on blood transfusions to treat the unbearable levels of pain. This World Blood Donor Day, the Dandridge family shares their gratitude for those who make the time to donate blood, for patients just like David and Skylar.

About Blood Donation

All blood types are needed on an ongoing basis. A blood donor card or driver’s license or two other forms of identification are required at check-in. Individuals who are 17 years of age in most states (16 with parental consent where allowed by state law), weigh at least 110 pounds and are in generally good health may be eligible to donate blood.

High school students and other donors 18 years of age and younger also have to meet certain height and weight requirements.

About the American Red Cross

The American Red Cross shelters, feeds and provides comfort to victims of disasters; supplies about 40% of the nation’s blood; teaches skills that save lives; distributes international humanitarian aid; and supports veterans, military members and their families. The Red Cross is a nonprofit organization that depends on volunteers and the generosity of the American public to deliver its mission. For more information, please visit redcross.org or CruzRojaAmericana.org, or follow us on social media.